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PLENARY SESSION: GENDER AND NUTRITION - CASE STUDY PRESENTATION: Bader Mahaman, Action contre la Faim

PLENARY SESSION: GENDER AND NUTRITION - CASE STUDY PRESENTATION: Bader Mahaman, Action contre la Faim

Contribution of the NCA to gender and nutrition causal analysis (Bader Mahaman Dioula, Julien Chalimbaud, Myriam Ait-Aissa)

One of the pathways towards food and nutrition security is through local production of nutritious food, an activity in which smallholder farmers play a crucial role. However, for smallholder agriculture to have real impacts on nutrition, it has to consider both the role of the men and the women in agriculture and the role of the men and the women in the farmers' household. Therefore, gender analysis taking into account factors such as women's roles as agricultural producers and caregivers, their time and labour allocation, and their access to the economic resources and benefits within the household is crucial.

The present case study describes an operational research project, the Nutritional Causal Analysis (NCA) conducted by Action Contre la Faim (ACF) and its scientific partners. The main goal of the NCA is to provide a methodology that helps in gaining a better understanding of the causes of malnutrition in a specific area and consequently to develop more effective prevention and treatment programmes. The issue of gender and women in nutrition is central to this analysis.

The NCA methodology combines both quantitative and qualitative data collection methods and analysis. It consists of the following phases: Context analysis, identification of causal hypothesis, quantitative cross sectional survey, qualitative inquiry, participatory rating of causal pathways and validation of key results.

Lessons learned from the implementation of the NCA methodology in two different contexts (Burkina-Faso and Tchad) are presented. Strengths and advantages of NCA as well as its constraints and limitations are also discussed.

Key findings: Results of the NCA showed that household access to water, spacing between births, economic security of women and their access to production resources and livelihoods were major determinants of under-nutrition. These findings provide evidence in support to technical advocacy on under-nutrition in different socio-economic contexts.